Free Aqua and Orange Disney Scrapbook Cards

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This year, we decided to go with an aqua and orange  color scheme for the photo book we made of our last Disney trip.

The idea started with this free set from Simple As That blog.disney-cards-set3

But, we needed MORE aqua and orange journaling cards to keep the book cohesive, so with a little trial and error, we made some coordinating journaling cards using Picmonkey and we are sharing them with all you other Disney memory keepers.

The link below is a .pdf with six 3×4 cards and two 4×6 cards set up to print on 2 sheets, or right click images individually to save them separately.

Aqua and Orange Disney Scrapbook Cards

Meeting Characters 4x64x6 MickeyMinnie kiss

Park Info 3x4 -3Park report 3x4 -1Park report graph 3x4 -2Rides 3x4Taste of Magic 3x43x4 mouse

Now, go get those photos off your phone and put them in a scrapbook or photo book that can be enjoyed by everyone for years to come.

Disney Photography – New Trends

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On our recent trip to Disney World, we discovered a few new photography trends.  First, of course, is that there were no more “selfie” sticks.  The use of them didn’t bother us, but it is nicer to get pictures of say, the castle, without a backdrop of selfie sticks.

Although we never owned or used a selfie stick, we did utilize a couple things to make phone photography better in the parks.

First, is the Shoulderpod S1.  This is a smartphone grip with a handle and strap that we purchased from Amazon.  The grip is adjustable to hold various sizes of phones/cameras and tightens securely.

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The handle was a little short for my husband’s taste, but perfect for our daughter and me.  So nice to not worry about dropping your phone off of Astro Orbiters!

smartphone grip at Disney World

You can see it in use here.

The second smartphone grip we purchased was the Reticam, also purchased at Amazon.

reticam phone grip

You can see the grip fits a larger hand more easily.  Using these grips made taking video much more steady.

The 3rd phone accessory we purchased is the Gostrap.  These are on our phone cases at all times and make it a lot easier to securely grab a photograph or send a message with just one hand on the phone.  It has been particularly great with our larger phones.

smartphone go strap

The second photography trend we noticed was an almost absence of iPads as cameras in the parks!  It was wonderful to watch parades, fireworks, and shows in real life and not through the screen of someones iPad.

Chinese acrobats at Epcot

In fact, as this picture shows, most people were just enjoying the show as it happened and not filming every second of this show with any device.  It is a trend that we saw throughout the week we were there.

The 3rd trend is that again, we took even more photos than the previous trips.  We were in the parks for 6 days again this year and took a total of 1320 images.  Last year, in 6 days, we took 1242.  I was a little surprised to see the number go up, but attribute it to a couple of things.  Isabella only took a rest once or twice during the week, so we were active all day every day.  This year seemed a little less crowded, so she was able to meet many more characters and she was enough taller to be able to ride several new rides.

It sounds like a lot of pictures, doesn’t it?  But, from all those images, we’ve printed a photo book and edited the photographs and video into a movie already.  More images will be used in our Project Life Disney album which will also include the journaling from the trip.  And, because you can see that these memories matter a lot to us, they are all backed up multiple times.

Disney Footprint Art – Roller Coasters and Chewbacca

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We’ve been faithful about gathering a footprint from Isabella after each Disney trip, but got a little behind on finishing them up, so today, we’ve got two to show you.

First, is her footprint from our 2014 trip.  Disney Footprint art - 3

This was the first year that Isabella was tall enough to ride a “big” roller coaster and she loved it.

The next footprint is from our trip last month:

Disney footprint art - 4

This year, besides roller coasters, Isabella was crazy for Chewbacca.  Chewbacca will not sign an autograph, so this is our way of remembering her interaction with him.

It’s hard to believe that Isabella’s first Disney footprint was when she was only 2 months old.  Her feet were so tiny!

Disney Footprint Art

And here’s from the year she turned 2 at Disney World:

goofy footprint art 1

We’re having fun making a little collection for her and trying to guess what her 2016 footprint will be!  Making these is turning out to be one of our favorite (and free!) souvenirs.

 

 

 

Christmas + Mouse Tags font + Quilting

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Some of our stockings didn’t really coordinate with the new Christmas tree skirt and we had a little fabric left over, so, with a little help from a free fun font called “Mouse Tags“, we were able to make new stockings!

DIY Disney graphics Christmas stocking

We took a basic stocking pattern and cut it out.  Then printed off icons from the Mouse Tags font at about a 400 pt. size.  With a light box underneath, we laid the stocking on top of the printed icons and used disappearing ink to trace the design.  We quilted it in matching grey thread and then assembled the stockings using the Cluck Cluck Sew Stocking Tutorial.

DIY Disney graphics Christmas stocking

One stocking has the Polynesian Resort icon.

DIY Disney graphics Christmas stocking

The other has the sorcerer’s hat.

Disney Knits are Here!

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It doesn’t take much to find Disney fabrics in every substrate from fleece to quilting cotton, but the one thing that has been missing has been cotton knits.  FINALLY, they are available, but so far, we’ve only seen them online.   Disney knit fabric

These knits are a light to medium weight cotton knit that is substantial enough that it is not see through, but are light enough knits that the fabric edges curl up after washing.  They are a good weight for t-shirts, but not leggings, etc.

This shirt is the Oliver and S Field Trip Raglan pattern sewn with the Many Faces of Mickey fabric we purchased from Fabric.com and black cotton jersey from Hancocks Fabrics.

Disney knit fabric

This shirt is a basic t-shirt pattern split diagonally in the front and back so we could use both the Anna Sketch fabric and Elsa Sketch fabric together.  This fabric was also ordered from Fabrics.com.

The fabrics are 58″ wide and were listed at $12.98/yard.  They are made by Springs Creative who is the manufacturer of the Disney fabrics at Joanns/Hancocks, etc., so hopefully, those stores will start to carry some of the knits in the near future.

 

Disney Viewfinder Christmas Tree Skirt

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Disney Viewfinder Christmas Tree skirt

It’s beginning to look and feel like Christmas and this year, we have a new Christmas tree skirt.  The idea was to make one that looked kind of like a Disney viewfinder reel.

The pictures in the viewfinder reel are all paper pieced quilt blocks sized to 10″ square.  Most of the patterns are available free on the fabulous Fandom in Stitches website.   It is a treasure trove of paper piecing and embroidery patterns for fans of everything from Harry Potter to the Muppets to Disney characters.  Alice in Wonderland was a previously untested pattern from the very generous and talented Alida at Tweety Loves Quilting.  In addition to her patterns, she has held a year long “Stretch Your Skills” series that has been really fun to learn from.

Here are what some of the blocks that Alida designed look like closer up:

Pluto paper pieced quilt block

Pluto was a relatively easy block to make if you have any paper piecing experience.

Mickey Mouse paper pieced quilt block

I didn’t do a good job picking a background for Mickey because his white gloves don’t show up well enough, but it seemed like a lot of work to go back and remake it, so it is staying put.

Alice in Wonderland paper pieced quilt block

Alice was a challenge to say the least.  The pieces are TINY and there are so many of them that this was the most difficult block of them all.  But, Isabella had such a fun experience with Alice in Wonderland on our last visit to Disney World, so I persevered.

Here’s hoping that it looks good under the Christmas tree with the Monorail running around it!

 

Mickey Mouse Pumpkin Carving!

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Check out our Mickey Mouse pumpkin for Halloween this year!

Mickey Mouse pumpkin

We created this Mickey pumpkin out of three different pumpkins, one big one for the head and two small for the ears.  We soaked all the pumpkins in a bleach solution before carving and soaked the big pumpkin again after carving.

Mickey Mouse pumpkin

We used a pumpkin surface carving kit by Pumpkin Masters (found at Hobby Lobby) to carve the Mickey Mouse face.  We then drilled two holes in the side of the big pumpkin and one hole each in the two small pumpkins.  We inserted a dowel in each hole on the big pumpkin and stuck the small pumpkins on the dowel to hold everything in place.

Happy Halloween!

A Disney Photographic Timeline

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The other day, our family was talking about how many times each of us had been to Disney parks.  For my husband, whose 1st visit was in 1955, the only record of it is a notation in his baby book saying that he had his first train ride there.  As a southern Californian, he went many times as a child, but there are no photographs of the visits.

Before our daughter was born, I had been to Disney World 2 times previously, but there is only 1 picture that I am in since I am usually the person behind the camera.

Most of our daughter’s Disney experiences have at least SOME record of her having been there, but looking at HOW I recorded her park visits is a little cringe-inducing now.

scrapbook page

Take a look at this page for instance.  Remember cutting photos into shapes and using decorative scissors?  It screams 1995 which is exactly when it was made.  At least I remembered to save the $22 Disneyland paper ticket!  That said, it might be time to make a new album of her Disney visits with just a little more modern look.  Perhaps, say, keeping the photographs square or rectangles?!  And maybe no decorative scissors?!

Fortunately, I still have all of my negatives safely stored in archival sleeves in binders.

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I don’t have a film scanner, but, as an Android user, there is a great free app called the Helmut Film Scanner that works simply and effectively with reasonable photo quality.  Take for instance, this photo of our dog meeting Mickey at a relay race.  This is a 35 mm scan with no sharpening, color correction, etc. done prior to or after the scan.

Border Collie meets Mickey Mouse

As I scanned negatives, I started keeping a tally of how many photographs were taken during each Disney visit.  The increase is staggering.

1992 – 9  (daughter’s first visit to Disneyland.)

1993 – 8

1994 – 22

1995 – 6 (birthday trip to DL with friend)

1996 – 3

1998 – 26 (first trip to WDW)

1999 – 2

2001 – 16

2003 – 59 (film + digital)

2010 – 513 (all digital from here on)

2012 – 76 (half marathon only)

2013 – 769

2014 – 1242

The ease of digital photography now means that everyone in our family has a way to capture memories and the quality of most of the images is really excellent.  The job of sorting through, editing, and laying out pages for scrapbooks and photo books is a lot more daunting though than the years where 4 or 5 pictures per trip was all you came home with.

Wonderful World of Disney Sewing – Experimenting

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When you are out on a run and your mind is wandering, it is easy to come up with some crazy ideas that you can’t wait to get home to try out.  That is the genesis of this next top.

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When we purchased the letter buttons for the corduroy jacket, they came with a set of colored buttons with the same letters.    We had some fabric at home that looked ok with the button colors so decided to try the free Izzy top pattern from Climbing the Willow.  But, we wanted to add a little twist to the bodice to tie it in with the MICKEY buttons.

The crazy running idea was to see if it was possible to make a Mickey head with honeycomb smocking.  I drew dots in a circle at 2 points along the radius for a Mickey head and Mickey ears.  Then, I did honeycomb smocking of the head first and then ears.  I wasn’t sure if it would work or not, but the fabrics were leftover pieces from some old quilt projects, so it was no cost if it didn’t work.

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The dots for the outer perimeter of the circles were 1/4 inch apart.  If I were doing it again, I would place them closer together.

After the honeycomb smocking was done, I basted around the shape of the Izzy pattern top to hold the fabric in place and then cut it out.  The bodice is lined, so the back of the smocking is covered.

Free pattern, leftover fabric, and an idea that kind of worked!  Guess that means we better lace up our running shoes and head back out.

Wonderful World of Disney Sewing – Winter Jacket

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You know how it is . . . you go into the fabric store just for a zipper and another cute Disney fabric lures you in!  This time it was at Hancock’s where we spotted this Mickey and Friends Cupcakes fine wale corduroy fabric.

We already had a pattern at home – Simplicity 1477 which is an adorable fox or raccoon jacket pattern that I bought last year.

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It only took a little modification to make the pattern suit the cupcake fabric.

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Instead of fox or raccoon ears, we made Mickey ears for the hood!

The jacket is lined and interfaced with fusible fleece, so should be plenty warm for southern winters.  Choosing the lining was a dilemma.  All the typical lining materials were too dull looking for such a whimsical jacket.  So, when we spotted some wonderfully soft brushed back princess themed satin in the perfect shade of pink, we went for it.

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It does kind of look like an explosion of pink and Disney, but that sounds like just the kind of thing that a 3 year old would love to wear!