Tag Archives: scrapbook

Free Aqua and Orange Disney Scrapbook Cards

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This year, we decided to go with an aqua and orange  color scheme for the photo book we made of our last Disney trip.

The idea started with this free set from Simple As That blog.disney-cards-set3

But, we needed MORE aqua and orange journaling cards to keep the book cohesive, so with a little trial and error, we made some coordinating journaling cards using Picmonkey and we are sharing them with all you other Disney memory keepers.

The link below is a .pdf with six 3×4 cards and two 4×6 cards set up to print on 2 sheets, or right click images individually to save them separately.

Aqua and Orange Disney Scrapbook Cards

Meeting Characters 4x64x6 MickeyMinnie kiss

Park Info 3x4 -3Park report 3x4 -1Park report graph 3x4 -2Rides 3x4Taste of Magic 3x43x4 mouse

Now, go get those photos off your phone and put them in a scrapbook or photo book that can be enjoyed by everyone for years to come.

Disney Photography – New Trends

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On our recent trip to Disney World, we discovered a few new photography trends.  First, of course, is that there were no more “selfie” sticks.  The use of them didn’t bother us, but it is nicer to get pictures of say, the castle, without a backdrop of selfie sticks.

Although we never owned or used a selfie stick, we did utilize a couple things to make phone photography better in the parks.

First, is the Shoulderpod S1.  This is a smartphone grip with a handle and strap that we purchased from Amazon.  The grip is adjustable to hold various sizes of phones/cameras and tightens securely.

Screen Shot 2016-01-29 at 10.05.27 AM

The handle was a little short for my husband’s taste, but perfect for our daughter and me.  So nice to not worry about dropping your phone off of Astro Orbiters!

smartphone grip at Disney World

You can see it in use here.

The second smartphone grip we purchased was the Reticam, also purchased at Amazon.

reticam phone grip

You can see the grip fits a larger hand more easily.  Using these grips made taking video much more steady.

The 3rd phone accessory we purchased is the Gostrap.  These are on our phone cases at all times and make it a lot easier to securely grab a photograph or send a message with just one hand on the phone.  It has been particularly great with our larger phones.

smartphone go strap

The second photography trend we noticed was an almost absence of iPads as cameras in the parks!  It was wonderful to watch parades, fireworks, and shows in real life and not through the screen of someones iPad.

Chinese acrobats at Epcot

In fact, as this picture shows, most people were just enjoying the show as it happened and not filming every second of this show with any device.  It is a trend that we saw throughout the week we were there.

The 3rd trend is that again, we took even more photos than the previous trips.  We were in the parks for 6 days again this year and took a total of 1320 images.  Last year, in 6 days, we took 1242.  I was a little surprised to see the number go up, but attribute it to a couple of things.  Isabella only took a rest once or twice during the week, so we were active all day every day.  This year seemed a little less crowded, so she was able to meet many more characters and she was enough taller to be able to ride several new rides.

It sounds like a lot of pictures, doesn’t it?  But, from all those images, we’ve printed a photo book and edited the photographs and video into a movie already.  More images will be used in our Project Life Disney album which will also include the journaling from the trip.  And, because you can see that these memories matter a lot to us, they are all backed up multiple times.

A Disney Photographic Timeline

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The other day, our family was talking about how many times each of us had been to Disney parks.  For my husband, whose 1st visit was in 1955, the only record of it is a notation in his baby book saying that he had his first train ride there.  As a southern Californian, he went many times as a child, but there are no photographs of the visits.

Before our daughter was born, I had been to Disney World 2 times previously, but there is only 1 picture that I am in since I am usually the person behind the camera.

Most of our daughter’s Disney experiences have at least SOME record of her having been there, but looking at HOW I recorded her park visits is a little cringe-inducing now.

scrapbook page

Take a look at this page for instance.  Remember cutting photos into shapes and using decorative scissors?  It screams 1995 which is exactly when it was made.  At least I remembered to save the $22 Disneyland paper ticket!  That said, it might be time to make a new album of her Disney visits with just a little more modern look.  Perhaps, say, keeping the photographs square or rectangles?!  And maybe no decorative scissors?!

Fortunately, I still have all of my negatives safely stored in archival sleeves in binders.

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I don’t have a film scanner, but, as an Android user, there is a great free app called the Helmut Film Scanner that works simply and effectively with reasonable photo quality.  Take for instance, this photo of our dog meeting Mickey at a relay race.  This is a 35 mm scan with no sharpening, color correction, etc. done prior to or after the scan.

Border Collie meets Mickey Mouse

As I scanned negatives, I started keeping a tally of how many photographs were taken during each Disney visit.  The increase is staggering.

1992 – 9  (daughter’s first visit to Disneyland.)

1993 – 8

1994 – 22

1995 – 6 (birthday trip to DL with friend)

1996 – 3

1998 – 26 (first trip to WDW)

1999 – 2

2001 – 16

2003 – 59 (film + digital)

2010 – 513 (all digital from here on)

2012 – 76 (half marathon only)

2013 – 769

2014 – 1242

The ease of digital photography now means that everyone in our family has a way to capture memories and the quality of most of the images is really excellent.  The job of sorting through, editing, and laying out pages for scrapbooks and photo books is a lot more daunting though than the years where 4 or 5 pictures per trip was all you came home with.

Disney Trip Sketchbook

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This is the second year that I brought along a watercolor sketchbook to WDW.

The reason I bring a sketchbook (even though my artistic abilities are minimal and we don’t stop for a lot of sketching breaks) is that there are things you just can’t capture with a still or video image.

For instance:

Disney sketchbook - Donald in Mexico

While waiting in line to see Donald in Mexico, it was fascinating to watch the family in front of us.  This year, we saw many children (big and small), sitting in strollers glued to iPads.  The boy in line in front of us never looked up until his parents insisted he get out and get a picture with Donald.  A couple of quick snapshots and he was back in the stroller playing a game on the tablet.

It seemed kind of sad that even Disney World was not enough entertainment for so many children, much less the adults who couldn’t pry themselves away from Facebook or Instagram to enjoy the experience.

Last year, I used my beloved Circa punch and discs to make a sketchbook.  This year, I brought a Strathmore 400 Series Hardbound Journal.  This year’s choice was a mistake.  I didn’t like not being able to fold the book back on itself like a disc or wire binding allows.  And a small water bottle leak in my backpack caused the binding to disintegrate, even though none of the pages were damaged.  I’m going back to a Circa disc bound sketchbook as soon as I finish the Strathmore one.  The flexiblity of adding and removing pages at will just works better for me.

Disney Memory Keeping – Watercolor Sketchbook

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Watercolor Sketchbook Epcot #DisneySide 014

We always keep a camera, or two or three, with us when traveling, and have years of scrapbooks to show for it.  But, always being behind a lens can have drawbacks.  It doesn’t tell the whole story and the quest to photograph everything can sometimes take away from being immersed in the experience.

I envied people who traveled with a sketchbook and could jot notes and sketches of their trips, but I had never drawn before and wasn’t sure if it was even possible to learn how at my age.

A search led to a workshop by a teacher named Marilynn Brandenburger on how to keep a watercolor sketchbook.  She taught how to get started and how to see things in a way that it was possible for a beginner to translate onto paper.  One of the biggest lessons she taught was that “It isn’t a painting, it’s a sketch.”

Disney World

Disneyland and Disney World are filled with scenes that could fill a sketchbook, but since our primary reason for being there is to experience it with our granddaughter, sketches have to be made very quickly.  Usually, it is when someone stops to look at a shop or take a bathroom break.

Sketching at Disney  World

On our last trip, I put together a little sketching kit that fit compactly in my bag and could be drawn out when there were a few free minutes.

travel watercolor sketching kit

For this trip, I decided on a 6″ square sketchbook.  It is bound using a Levenger Circa punch and discs.   The beauty of this type of “binding” is that you can make any size or shape of book you want and take pages in and out as desired.  Park maps or other paper ephemera can be punched and added at any time.

A  Micron pen and mechanical pencil get the sketch started.  A little 2″ x 4″ box holds a kneaded eraser, a waterbrush and a little tin of watercolors.

watercolor sketch kit

Inside the tiny Altoid tin, I used Sculpey to make a little watercolor travel kit.

Altoid watercolor tin

Using a waterbrush means not having to carry a cup of water to be able to paint.

An added bonus is that Isabella can paint, too, while we stand in line or wait for a parade!